Our Research

Here at IAL, our Research Division aims to provide a strong knowledge base for the development of practice in CET.

Our Research

As an institute that champions excellence in Continuing Education and Training, IAL undertakes research projects that examine the various aspects of adult learning and development. The data we gather and the results we analyse enable us to further the advancement of the CET sector in Singapore, and inform policy making and decisions.

Search Icon
our research
Completed | 2017

Programme for the Int'l Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC)

Prof Johnny Sung, Emily Low, Dr Cheng San Chye, Simon Freebody, Sheng Yee Zher, Tan Bao Zhen

PIAAC is an initiative of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that assists governments in assessing, monitoring and analysing the level and distribution of skills among their adult populations as well as the extent of skills use in different contexts.

Find Out More Find Out More Icon
our research
Completed | 2010

Promoting and Supporting Lifelong Employability for Singapore's Workers Aged 45 and Above

Prof Stephen Billett

The research projects aims to understand more about how best to assist mature-age workers maintain their employability across working life and what Singaporean workplaces and government agencies might do to maintain their employability. For personal, family, workplaces and national purposes, these workers now likely need to engage in a longer productive working life, and potentially engage increasingly in PMET work.

Find Out More Find Out More Icon
our research
Completed | 2016

Reflective Curriculum Model

Dr Helen Bound, Dr Michael Choy

This project builds on a model of curriculum developed by Peter Rushbrook (see Bound, Rushbrook & Sivalingam, 2013) that in this report we call the Institute for Adult Learning (IAL) Design Approach (IDeA) Model. The present researchers (Bound and Choy, in consultation with Rushbrook) envisage the model as a tool for designers and facilitators of learning to reflect on their assumptions about curriculum, learning and learners. However, participants also identified many other potential applications, including for structured continuing professional development and as a communication tool at all stages of curriculum development. Given the changing landscape and focus of the continuing education and training sector, these suggestions offer considerable potential to facilitate change; indeed some described the model and heuristic as potentially “transformational”.

Find Out More Find Out More Icon