Our Research

Here at IAL, our Research Division aims to provide a strong knowledge base for the development of practice in CET.

Our Research

As an institute that champions excellence in Continuing Education and Training, IAL undertakes research projects that examine the various aspects of adult learning and development. The data we gather and the results we analyse enable us to further the advancement of the CET sector in Singapore, and inform policy making and decisions.

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our research
Completed | 2011

Development of a CET Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

Prof Andrew Brown, Rebecca Ye

Singapore is facing a major challenge in continuing education and training: to demonstrate the results from the government‘s increasing investment in the sector. This document takes up this challenge and proposes a framework for monitoring and evaluation that will enable us to measure the outcomes of continuing education and training (CET), learn from the implementation of CET programmes and maximise the impact of future CET initiatives.

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our research
Completed | 2011

Developments in Policy Systems and Delivery: United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand

Dr Gary Willmott, Annie Karmel, Fiona Loke, Catherine Ramos

The report profiles the scope of research agencies in vocational and continuing education and labour market studies in Australia, the UK and New Zealand and briefly reviews the types of research being undertaken and the way in which research policy and agendas are formulated.

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our research
Completed | 2019

Dialogical Teaching: Investigating Awareness of Inquiry and Knowledge Co-Construction among Adult Learners engaged in Dialogic Inquiry

Dr Helen Bound and Assoc Prof Tan Seng Chee

To compete in the knowledge economy of the 21st century, organizations need to innovate and develop new capabilities to harness values of knowledge resources (Carlucci, 2014). Consequently, education of the workforce must adapt to the new business environments in the knowledge economy. In Singapore, the key goals suggested by the Committee on the Future Economy (2017) include the need for workers to develop and apply deep skills and strengthening enterprise abilities to innovate and scale up innovative practices. It is thus imperative to identify and improve adult learning approaches that can enhance the capacity of our workers to be innovative and productive knowledge workers. A promising approach is dialogic teaching, which refers to “a pedagogical approach that involves students in the collaborative construction of meaning and is characterized by shared control over the key aspects of classroom discourse.” (Reznitskaya & Gregory, 2013, p. 114) It gives learners agency and control over their learning processes and topics for inquiry, and more critically, engages them in collaborative meaning making and tapping into their rich experiences as resources for learning. Dialogical inquiry, knowledge building and co-construction, all aspects of this study, are important future readiness capabilities. Yet, research on a dialogic approach to adult learning is limited, internationally and locally. This qualitative project collects a rich range of data from two courses in two different Masters programs conducted at NIE, NTU to address the following research questions: i. How do adult learners in formal graduate courses 1 develop awareness of their inquiry and how do they co-construct knowledge? ii. How do adult learners perceive the relevance and effectiveness of dialogical approach to teaching and learning? iii. What are the implications of the dialogical approach for the practices of adult educators?

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